Madame Renita Holmes is a lifelong activist, a resident of Miami’s Little Haiti neighborhood and a graduate of CLEO’s Empowering Resilient Women (ERW) program. In this blog post, she talks about how her experiences living on a low income as a Black woman in Miami have brought her to prioritize

For Jared Genova, summer weather in Miami goes one of two ways. “When it’s not raining, it’s hot,” he says. Genova is an urban strategist with ISeeChange, a technology company whose app helps communities document their experiences with flooding, extreme heat and storms. ISeeChange’s work in South Florida is part

The perils Florida farmworkers face today build upon the perils of the past. For hundreds of years, workers have toiled under the hot sun in Florida’s fields, harvesting oranges, tomatoes, sugar, green beans and cucumbers. Historically, the slaves, indentured servants and sharecroppers here were Black and brown, subsisting on low

Madame Renita Holmes believes gardening is a powerful antidote to trauma. A longtime Miami resident and activist who uses the honorific “madame”, Madame Holmes grew up in foster care, where she experienced and witnessed abuse. As a teenager, she started her own landscaping company, later hiring women who had been

Walk, bike, or drive on almost any major road in Miami, and you can see how the built environment reflects disparities that are being amplified by the climate crisis. A lack of covered bus stops and shade trees in Allapattah, Little Havana, and Liberty City makes residents vulnerable to rising

The word “resilience” has generated a buzz among people working on the climate crisis. In Florida, the word is often used to describe a response to a local impact of climate change. In January, for example, Governor Ron DeSantis announced a new “Resilient Florida” initiative, which will provide $2 billion

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